‘The Wall’ that will never ever be built

Fun FACTS about the US-Mexican Border, Immigration and ‘The Wall’ that will never ever be built – simply because it can’t be!

Please keep in mind that before you comment, when it comes to immigration, there are many views, few of which are wholly right or wrong, but regardless of your opinion, this information is not mine, it is actual documented nonpartisan data and indisputable:

Size Matters ~ The border is 1,954 miles (3,145 km) which spans from the Pacific Ocean in the west to the Gulf of Mexico in the east …

Love a man or woman in uniform? ~ there are currently 19,887 agents from the US Border Patrol that are patrolling our border, making it one of the largest law enforcement agencies in the United States, with an annual budget of $3,805,253,000 (that’s almost 4 Billion dollars a year already spent on securing our borders for those that got lost in commas) …

Is that a security barrier on our border, or are you just happy to see us? ~ 654 miles, or roughly, one-third, of our borders are already fenced, much of which was completed during Barack Obama’s presidency, as part of the Secure Fence Act of 2006, which was signed by George W. Bush …

Beaches, Rivers and Mountains, OH MY! ~ Due to the incredibly varied nature of the terrain the border covers, it is impossible to build a wall of any material. Starting in the California, in order to reinforce the wall currently in place on the border between San Diego and Tijuana, construction materials would have to contend with corrosive salt spray, changing tides, and heavy winds. Farther east in inland California lie the Algodones Dunes, also known as the Imperial Dunes—the largest sand dune ecosystem in the United States. George W. Bush’s administration oversaw the construction of a seven-mile “floating fence” specifically engineered to work with the shifting sands. The border territory farther east in Arizona and New Mexico is so mountainous—Coronado National Forest is home to several 9,000-foot peaks—it’s been described as “unfenceable.” Then once the border wall reached Texas, the floodplains of the Rio Grande present an immense logistical hurdle. The river traces the border between Texas and Mexico, and its floodplains extend onto either side of the border. Flooding from the Rio Grande is not an uncommon occurrence, particularly when hurricanes hit, and border fences that exist in the region have exacerbated flooding by acting as a dam where water is meant to flow freely. Not to mention, per a 1970 boundary treaty signed by the United States and Mexico, both countries are prohibited from building any structure that would disrupt the flow of either the Rio Grande or the Colorado River, which draws a small section of the border between Arizona and Baja California …

This land is your land, this land is my land ~ Approximately 66% of land along the border line is either privately or state owned; the rest is owned by the federal government or Native tribes. So even if the federal government becomes successful in using eminent domain to seize private and state property for the construction – impacting thousands more homeowners (mostly ranchers in Texas who rely on access to the Rio Grande and wide pastures for their livestock) only after of course a significant delay caused by their resistance which in itself would create an additional costly nightmare – around 75 miles of the land in Arizona is part of the Tohono O’odham Indian reservation which is the third-largest reservation by area in the United States which still has tribe members living on both sides of the border and like to freely cross between the two as they consider the entirety of the territory their ancestral lands even after it was divided between the two countries by the Gadsden Purchase …

PETA ~ Border constructions have a detrimental effect on the many valuable wildlife reserves and diverse ecosystems found along the border. Animals rely on hunting on lands that extend onto both sides of the border. Existing border barriers regularly cut animals off from their water sources and migration corridors …

Why is it called Tourist season if you can’t shoot them ~ The Rio Grande Valley of Texas is one of the most biodiverse regions in all of North America, and tourism is a major part of the economy for communities on both sides of the border; wildlife watchers spend some $463 million in the valley annually. Border barriers already affect as much as 70 percent of the valley’s three national wildlife refuges, reducing the range size for some animals by as much as 75 percent. According to a 2014 report, the construction of security barriers along the border have a negative impact on animal species living on protected areas …

Never try to leap from a standstill ~ Despite recent claims of a ‘Crisis of Illegal Immigration’, after four decades that brought 12 million immigrants—most of whom came illegally—the current net migration flow from Mexico to the United States has stopped and may have reversed, according to a new analysis of government data from both countries. The U.S. Customs and Border Protection recorded only 303,916 unauthorized immigrants entering in 2017 which is the lowest number in more than a decade; while in the same year, the Department of Homeland Security reported 340,056 people were removed from the U.S. …

Huston we have a (new) problem ~ So as Mexicans are becoming a shrinking number of recent arrivals, the amount of all unauthorized immigrants who had arrived from Asia within the previous five years increased from to 22% from 13%; the share from the Northern Triangle nations in Central America grew from 11% to 18%; and the total from the rest of the world (other than Asia, Central America and Mexico) rose to more than a third of recent arrivals, compared with about a quarter in 2007…

Visa or Mastercard? ~ Knowing that border crossings and illegal entry is no longer accounting for a majority of the people joining the unauthorized population, the Department of Homeland Security estimated 628,799 people who had previously entered the country legally overstaying their visas; making visa overstays responsible for about two-thirds of the total number of people joining the undocumented population in any given year …

If you like Pina Coladas, and getting caught in the rain ~ Finally let’s not forget that Mexico, while it’s bound in the north to the US (specifically California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas), is surrounded by water ways – on the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, the east by the Gulf of Mexico, and the southeast by Belize, Guatemala, and the Caribbean Sea. Not to mention that if you can fly in to go drink cocktails on their beaches, they can fly out …

So while American taxpayers have already spent billions of dollars on border security, including the physical barrier along the southern border with Mexico – over the past 24 years, the amount of money spent on border security has increased 14 times; the number of border patrol agents have increased 500 percent; the amount of border wall has grown from 77 miles to almost 700 miles; and the number of people being apprehended trying to cross the border have decreased by four-fifths – we still have an illegal immigration problem that needs to be dealt with, but ‘The Wall’ isn’t the answer.

Well unless of curse if the question is: ‘How can you have any pudding if you don’t eat yer meat?’

And never forget, especially during this holiday season, that you don’t know everyone’s story or struggles, and regardless of your race, nationality, sexual orientation, day you take out the trash or have your nails done, just like you, everyone else is attempting to do their best in this crazy world, fighting to stay alive and trying to find their own happiness, which may not mirror yours, but it doesn’t make it wrong, just wrong for you, and that’s what makes you a fabulous fucking individual!

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